career tips from female entrepreneurs

Posted on: Friday, April 3, 2015

Loved this list of advice from female entrepreneurs curated on A Cup of Jo and wanted to re-share. Something that I’ve been thinking a lot about lately is the impact and influence of female leaders in the workplace. I’ve been really inspired by some female leaders in my career and think the advice from these entrepreneurs is helpful and spot-on – from dealing with awkward, difficult conversations to thank you notes to work/life balance and everything in between.

AMANDA HESSER AND MERRILL STUBBS, FOOD52:

If you told a story about your career, would it be interesting and surprising? If not, think about the path you’re carving. You spend a large part of your life working—make it a story you want to tell.

RONY VARDI, CATBIRD:

Approach difficult conversations head on. Realize that it’s undoubtedly difficult for the other person too and put it out there, right up front: “This might be a difficult conversation, so let’s work this out together.”

ANNE SERRANO-MCCLAIN, MCMC FRAGRANCES:

I don’t let fear get the best of me. When you have your own business, there’s so much you don’t understand how to do. How do I get a barcode for my product? How do I make my blog link to my website? Can I even pull off this big project? I usually say yes first, and figure it out later. I don’t let any opportunity slip away. I study hard and learn to do it, even if that means learning the hard way.

DEB PERELMAN, SMITTEN KITCHEN:

Find a schedule that works for you: Take note of the times you feel sharpest each day, when you want to crawl under the covers and take a nap, and when you’re the most stressed about everything, including your place in the world.

SHARON MONTROSE, THE ANIMAL PRINT SHOP:

Take the breakdowns in stride. I’d be lying if I didn’t admit I’ve had many a day ruined by some kind of stressor: a rude customer, our server going down. I finally realized what has me in knots one day, doesn’t even phase me two weeks later. I’m much better at rolling with the punches now and less time is wasted ruminating on things that don’t matter in the long run.

EVA JORGENSEN, SYCAMORE STREET PRESS:

Once a year (or whenever something new comes up—new baby, new job, illness, move…) pretend your life is an overflowing closet. In order to really get it organized, you can’t just remove one or two things here or there. You have to take everything out and then one by one put the most important things back in. When you get to a point where it feels good—close to full, but not crowded or crammed—stop. Get rid of everything else. Sometimes you have to get rid of good things in your life in order to make room for the best things.

KAVI AHUJA MOLTZ, D.S. & DURGA:

A nice handwritten thank-you note is always appreciated—for meeting, for a piece of good press, for any reason! It’s also worth investing in good quality personalized stationary.

View the full list of advice here.



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